Monster Blog

My blog is always in the back of my mind. Unfortunately, despite being a classic DINK (double income no kids), I still find it difficult to find time to write, which is a shame because A LOT has happened this year worthy of blogging about! So I’m going to do a mighty big ‘Monster’ post to cover ALL of it so I’m up to date and can get back into blogging without having all the things I haven’t written about weighing on my mind!

The Triathlon

I competed in my very first triathlon in March. Now, let’s not get carried away, it was not a 12 hour iron man by any stretch. It was an enticer length women’s triathlon designed to, well, entice the ladies into trying a triathlon. It worked. I was so intimidated by the idea of a triathlon, especially the swim and the transitions (i.e. going from swim to bike and bike to run) that I wouldn’t have gotten up the nerve for anything bigger. To be honest, the idea of mixed gender triathlon intimidates me, which is super lame…in any case it was the perfect mix of circumstance to get me out there.

I was number 1 because of my last name. Not because I was super keen or seeded. Just to let to 20 people who asked/assumed that know...

I was number 1 because of my last name. Not because I was super keen or seeded. Just to let the 20 people who asked/assumed that know…

For anyone considering doing a tri, here are my top tips

–         Do it with a friend! I was so nervous at the start, getting my stuff set up and trying not to feel completely out of place but my good friend Tania helped me keep calm. We also had great fun training together and shared tips we’d found online (including using bright towels to find where our bikes were ‘racked’).

–         Practice your transitions (no brainer)…more than once. I thought I had my transitions sorted, had practiced a swim to ride and a ride to run. But my transition times were terrible on the day. I underestimated the importance of transitions for my time which was out by about 5 minutes on what I had wanted to do. I know it was my transitions which let me down. My husband who was there watching said I dawdled on the bike to run and stopped to do up my shoelace. I guess I used the transitions as a rest to recover from the leg before, but really they should be done briskly and running just as hard as you would in the run leg.

–         Don’t be scared of the swim! I was and it was unfounded. If you are worried about the swim just hang back a bit on your first one to start and do at least twice as long as the length in practice sessions (depends how far you are going! Ours was only 300 m but our training swims were 1 km). I jumped straight in with everyone despite fear of being hit in the face by an errant foot and didn’t get hit once. My strangest experience was coming up for a breath, facing the right, looking straight at someone less than six inches away who was coming up for a breath facing left! Awkward .

–         Pace yourself on the swim. I went out HARD (nervous energy no doubt) and the leg to the first buoy was super easy, to the second felt like I was dying and the final two were strong. So maybe don’t go out too hard for the swim. Don’t panic about being the last, I did and felt really self-conscious and like I would be the last out of the water. As long as you have done some swim training beforehand, you won’t be last in an enticer (I recommend doing an enticer!) and if you need to catch your breath for a second or around the buoys, just do breaststroke! It’s not the end of the world!

–         Think through what you are wearing and the order you will need to change. I wore leggings for the ride/run which – after the swim – were very difficult to get on in a hurry. That was a mistake – nothing tight!!

–         Get a support team! Every time I passed my cheer squad I got a huge boost and they always made me smile yelling funny things out or just cheering.

All in all, I felt like it was a real accomplishment. Yes, it was only a tiny portion of the full Olympic distance tri (which I watched my brother-in-law compete in the next day, very inspiring!) but the challenge, fear and exhaustion all combined with adrenaline, strength and sense of achievement for us both to decide that next year, we’re going to do the next one up. Like big girls 🙂

To the Snow Fields – In Summer…

Well, not quite summer, but in early Autumn (March) hubby and I decided to load up the mountain bikes for a road trip…to the snow fields! During summer, they open up Thredbo – one of our favourite slopes in the winter, for riding.

On the way, we stopped in Canberra, which is a mountain bike mecca. So many places to choose from for riding! We decided on Stromlo which is a mountain bike park which makes Glenrock (my local) look pretty average (and it is not, Glenrock is massively sweet as bro). It was well maintained, the trails are well thought out and overall just sooooo much fun! I even tried a see-saw for the first time (and did it successfully once).

Our second ride at Stromlo was on the morning we had to get to Thredbo by the afternoon for our mountain bike induction. We chose a loop we thought would be doable in the time we had but ended up slightly stressed out as it took a bit longer than expected! Probably because of the truly monstrous climb which was involved – I almost died and had to have several breaks. In the end the trail was super fun and we were sad to leave but excited to get to Thredbo and do some full on downhill riding.

I’m not a downhill rider, luckily in the last season Thredbo put in what was referred to as a ‘flow-trail’ which was challenging but not out of the ream for an intermediate rider – probably not for full on beginners though. In order to get our passes, we had to do a mountain bike induction which basically involved some instruction on getting on the chair-lift with our bikes (which was surprisingly easy). We also had to do a quick test with our guide to show we had basic MTB skills, just going down a hill with a few turns which we passed easily. He said it was surprising how many people with zero bike skills wanted to try the trail and without some skills, its just plain dangerous. He then showed us down the flow trail to shows us the features and also point out where it crosses with the DH trail for hubby.

Thredbo on bikes!

Thredbo on bikes!

It was super fun but also a real challenge and kind of scary in places. We did the induction in the afternoon and were all set to go for a full day the next day. It was a good idea as the induction takes up a couple of hours and you still have to pay for a full-day pass afterwards if you want to keep going. I ended up doing the trail seven times and it took about 20 minutes each time. By the 4th or 5th, I was feeling it. In fact it HURT and not where you might expect. Of course my hands hurt from gripping the brakes just to stay in control (in fact when we took my bike to be serviced, they said I’d worn out my brake pads! Yep, that’s embarrassing). My forearms hurt the worst and every bump felt like torture. The first half was the worst, very bumpy, but the second half was smooth and super fun and by the bottom I thought ‘that wasn’t so bad, I could do another!’.

It was weird being at ‘the snow’, as well call it, when there was no snow. It was a ghost town. MTB riding on actual mountains has not really picked up in Australia to the same extent as in Canada (i.e Whistler). I think though that they need more trails before that will happen. Yes it was fun, but the same run over and over starts to lose its excitement and if we wanted to stay more than a day or two there needs to be more variety. All in all I think I enjoyed Stromlo the most, although I learnt a lot from my downhill riding. There is a downhill flow track on Stromlo we did once on the way to the snow and once on the way back. On the way back, I beat my first time by about 2 minutes, which I attribute to the confidence boost I got in Thredbo.

The Colo(u)r Run

A friend of mine asked me way back in February if I wanted to join her on the Color Run. I was hesitant. Firstly, in Australia we spell it with a u, i.e. Colour. Secondly, it is a purely for profit event with ‘runners’ able to contribute to charity at their will but no donations from the organisers. Thirdly, it is a total gimmick where people run in tutus and the majority do not even run it with people stopping to dance around in coloured powders like idiots. I mean, come on I am a runner, not some half-arsed walk/runner who needs a gimmick to want to run…

Um.

Yes, I own two tutus...

Yes, I own two tutus…

Yeah it was awesome. Soooo much fun with some great friends who were totally into it and we basically had fun dodging around people, not caring about getting dirty, or looking like idiots in our tutus, smoothing coloured powder on ourselves and each other and leaping around/pretending to be horses (it was around a race track) when we should have been running. Yes, a lot of people just sauntered the whole thing. Yes, we stopped to dance around like ‘smurfs (blue)’ or ‘oompa loompas (orange)’ at each of the colour stations. No, charity did not benefit. But do you know what? Even though I like to run for a cause, sometimes I just want to have some fun and am prepared to pay money to someone else to sort out the details.

And they damn well sorted it.

It was so well organized, no crowding or too much waiting which, for an event where over 10,000 people joined in (pretty much all of Newcastle was there it seemed), is saying something. The after party was good fun with music and hyped up DJs and everyone going nuts with their little finishing packets of powder, exploding everywhere.

It has actually gotten me excited about running again, I enjoyed it so much. I did parkrun the day before in preparation, knowing I wasn’t going to push on the event day, and did NOT enjoy my run. But after doing the colour run… I really wanted to go back and do a parkrun! Weird eh? I’m actually pretty keen to sign up for another event soon to keep my current running motivation going. I was reading through my old City2Surf posts and thinking about how defeated I felt afterwards compared to how I felt after the Color run…no contest really. After City2Surf I wanted to vomit. After the Colour run I wanted to party.

So let’s party, feet, let’s party.

 In Summary…

I actually have about 2 or 3 other things to talk about (commuting to work by bike, loving on MTB riding a bit more, swimming during winter, RAW challenge) but this is more monster than I had intended and I have some other shit to do. So I will leave you with some Mantras I’ve been using lately:

No-one is thinking about you. They’re thinking about themselves…just like you

Why should they overtake you? You are strong, fast and ride all the time. You ARE the fastest

I LIKE going to the gym. It isn’t a chore, it’s a privilege!

Happy travels!

Back in the Saddle

Sometimes you just need to bite the bullet and do what you are putting off or dreading. Fear is an interesting thing and I always think about an experiment involving spiders which I came across a few years back. Basically, people scared of spiders experience a spike of fear and adrenaline when they first see a spider. This initial feeling of fear is the most intense and does not increase past this point the longer they are looking at the spider.

Running was my spider until this morning. You see, I haven’t been running this year since I have been focused on the thrilling sport of mountain bike riding (and let’s face it, I just didn’t feel like running). Although I want to keep up my riding, it is also time to get back in the running saddle (the horse analogy would really be more appropriate to bike riding I suppose…). I have been putting it off and making excuses since my last parkrun 8 weeks ago!

My time was not the best. In fact it is my third slowest ever (for parkrun). But you know what, I ran the whole thing. I went. I ran 5 km. I set my alarm, got up and went out for a run. I almost bailed several times: when I set my alarm the night before, when my alarm went off (the first, second AND third time), after I got dressed and once I was in the car were ALL breaking points where I asked myself how much I really wanted to go (the answer was an unconvincing: “lots?”).

But I am so, so happy I went. Now I KNOW I can still run 5 km and it isn’t horrible. I didn’t die, in fact I felt pretty good after which means I could have gone faster. My initial fear has spiked. I faced it and now I can move on to enjoying running again. This first time is the hardest it is going to be; it all gets easier from here. Which is just as well because….

I’m doing a TRIATHLON! That’s right, a friend and I have signed up for a triathlon! Impressive, no? Um, no not really. It is an enticer tri-athlon for women to encourage involvement in the sport (brilliant idea) – and it worked on us! The distances are as follows:

SWIM = 300 m (cake. My friend Tania and I swim that easy in our weekly sessions)

RIDE = 10 km (too easy. I ride 10 km routinely and often through the bush, so on the flat it will be a cinch)

RUN = 3 km (puh, not even a parkrun!)

However…put them all together and I don’t know how it will all work out. Especially since it is in less than a month and I have only just started running again… I have no idea how long it will take, I don’t know how I will feel after each leg or where I will sit in the scheme of the other entrants. But I am going to do it and I will be training as hard as I can over the next few weeks in a last ditch attempt to not completely embarrass myself!

To get motivated, I dug through my old Womens Health mags and did some creative (for me) cutting and pasting. I called the book my ‘find your motivation’ picture book. I think it worked. I definitely feel like going for a run when I look at the running page and I am always keen to go riding so that one works a little too well (screw work lets got for a MTB ride!!).

Cutting and pasting is not just for kindergarten...

Cutting and pasting is not just for kindergarten…

I found it useful anyway. Weight loss is such a small part of why I ride, run and sign up for events like triathlons – but it can easily become the focus. So why am I running? Because I like to run, I like how I feel while running and after a run. I like how it makes me feel physically – strong and powerful. I like the effect fitness has on my daily life, enjoying the natural world and the city I live in.

YOLO right?

I run…to leave the old me behind

On Sunday I participated in ‘Run Newcastle,’ a new event which has come to town (there seem to be more and more each year which is great). I hadn’t put much thought into it, certainly hadn’t been training, but my sister said she was doing it and I should too.  So, last-minute decision, I was in!

The night before I was looking through my race pack and the bib had something a little bit different on it: A space asking WHY I was taking part. It really made me stop and think. Why WAS I doing it? I wasn’t training for it, trying to lose weight or get fit, I wasn’t trying to raise money or set a good example (although I do like to think I am setting a good example for my darling niece and other little treasures in my life). So why? To support my sister whose idea it was? Partly, but there is more to it. I realised I wanted to do it because quite simply I wouldn’t have dreamt of doing it only a few short years ago. I trained for months for my first 5 km, this race I signed up only the week before on a whim. I have changed, and I think it is important to reflect on that.

Good question...

Good question…

I think it may be the best fun run I have done. It wasn’t too long, I wasn’t stressing about it beforehand and…. I bloody well smashed it! It actually had a few quite large hills, but I had gone in with a game plan: walk the hills. City2Surf (shudder) I ‘ran’ up the hills, but my pace was so slow I was basically walking. This time, I walked FAST. I power walked with geeky arms swinging up the hill for the steepest parts and then ran again.

Here’s the kicker, I still did the run in only just over a 6 minute kilometer (39 min 20 for 6.5 km, they were a little misleading calling it a 6 km run as it was actually more!)! That’s only just over 5 km in 30 minutes timing which is incredible since the last parkrun I did (also 5 km) was 32 minutes. Even more incredible that today I did another 6 km run, no hills or walking, and my pace was much slower at 6 min 30 seconds per km! Why was Sunday so good? How did I perform so well? I think it was just a combination of great weather, good lead up, pumping atmosphere, walking the hills (GENIUS method, I truly am converted) and really pushing myself down the hills to an astonishing (for me) pace (my max pace recorded was 4:06 min/km! Say WHAAA???).

We also got the nicest event tee I've gotten! Win win!

We also got the nicest event tee I’ve gotten! Win win!

I felt so pumped afterwards (can you see me finishing with a winners double hand pump at the finish line?)  and was super proud of my sister who did an incredible 5 minute 40 second timing (finishing in 36 minutes 30 sec). Her ‘why I run Newcastle’ reason was to set a good example for her baby girl Cate and I know Cate will one day appreciate the achievements of her incredible super-mummy, I know I do. After the race I just stared at my splits (1 km splits that is) shaking my head at the pace. I’m not sure I could do it again, it just seems so unlike me…I have hardly been doing any running lately (barefoot testing be damned) and instead all my efforts have mainly been devoted to MTB riding. In fact I am obsessed with getting out on the trail and no doubt some of my running success was due to the improved fitness from riding so much.

I also missed posting about the Fernleigh15 which was a 15 km fun run along a track in Newcastle called, surprise surprise, the Fernleigh Track. Another event I signed up to from inspiration by my sister and, once again, hadn’t given a lot of thought to. It was pretty fun although very bloody long (15 km in 1 hr 46 min 15 seconds average pace 7 min/km – we walked a bit of it) but my sister and I did it together which was lovely. We walked parts (no way I could have run the whole thing without training for it).

I like to give a thumbs up when I pass a camera, such a loser...

I like to give a thumbs up when I pass a camera, such a loser…

All in all I liked it so much better than the City2Surf and think I will make it the focus of my training as next years big run…and just be a spectator at next years City2Surf!

In the end it has reminded me that running can be fun. I don’t need to make it the focus of my life, but I will be incorporating it more than I have been lately. And leaving my old self well and truly behind…

Barefoot Beginnings

In the name of science, I have started running barefoot. Well, almost barefoot. I am taking part in a year-long running trial, one of the largest and most comprehensive internationally. I was ‘randomly’ allocated to trial the Vibram  FiveFinger Seeya, one of 11 possible shoes representing different degrees of support. And I was dreading it. Not only for their stupid appearance but for the inevitable pain of learning to run in a different way. Barefoot running forces you to run with a toe first strike (if you land heel first it is very painful). Toe-striking engages different muscles compared to heel-striking, especially in the foot, ankle and calve.

So. What are they like? Well, I actually kind of love the look of them, which surprised me. The colours are complimentary and subtle and I think they make my feet look…kind of dainty in a way. I have big feet, not huge but proportionate to my height which I would say is maybe a bit above average. Anyway, I also have wide feet and low arches. Not pretty feet. But in the FiverFinger, they look kind of cute. Having said that, the first time my sister saw me in them for a run she burst out laughing. Maybe they look more like clown shoes than I thought…

The Vibram FiveFinger Seeya

The Vibram FiveFinger Seeya

They feel very, very close to toe-socks. Very flexible and with only a small amount of plastic to protect the foot from the road. It took me about 10 minutes to put them on the first time, I just couldn’t get my damn toes in each of their allocated pockets. Frustration! Now they slide on easy, I think its because I just relax my foot and put them on like a normal shoe whereas the first time I was stretching them out to try and separate them. Now they are a quicker option to shoes and socks. They are very comfortable to walk around in and hug the foot gently.

Barefoot

It feels strange to run in them. I can feel the road and anything on the footpath through the shoe and avoid rocks carefully.  Today I got a rock stuck between the toes as I was running and had to stop to pick it out. The first time I tried them I only did maybe 1 km in them before changing into my other shoes. No problems I thought, that didn’t hurt at all! The next day my calves ached. The second time I thought I would run a bit further and pushed it it 2.5 km. By the end my calves and shins were hurting. When I changed into my normal shoes to finish the run I couldn’t keep going more than another 2 km or so because of the pain. But the worst part? The blisters. Every time I wore them they rubbed the top and side of my foot near the strap and are pretty painful (you can see the blisters in the top pic). Last week I did a couple of longer runs in them (>3 km) and the blisters were super painful with blisters starting on the bottom of my big toes. My calves were still hurting after every run and now my ankles were starting to hurt. This is despite realising that actually, I am a toe striker naturally so the transitions shouldn’t be overly painful. In my normal shoes I land maybe a little flat footed but certainly towards the ball.

Give up! I was advised. Why are you pushing it? I was asked. I started to ask myself the same thing.

But recently, it has started to click. I did 3.4 km in them this afternoon followed by a nice yoga session. I still had blisters (on the bottom of my big toes, pretty painful) but my ankles and calves felt fine for the run, bit sore afterwards but not a lot. The hills I did actually felt pretty good too. I have mentioned before that I struggle with hills and I suspect it has to do with my technique as I get a sore back after a lot of hill running.

In the end, I made a commitment to test the shoes (in the name of science) and I’m going to keep at it. I think I can see the light though, it is starting to get easier and I think they will be nice and cool for summer running. I’ll be doing my first 5 km in no time…

Ready to Rumble

Less than 24 hours to go! In fact this time tomorrow I will be in a world of pain, pushing my body and mind to its limits amongst 85,000 other runners, walkers and costumed bumblers. Am I ready? Hells yeah!!!!

Actually I’m getting really excited. I’ve had a good week of tapering including rest and moderate exercise. I wasn’t going to run yesterday but I decided to do an easy 30 minutes, taking my time and then do a yoga session. It was a good idea and reminded me why I like running. My favourite time of day to run (sunset) with my pal Melvin and a lovely stretch afterwards.

Today hubby is playing soccer (mad, since he is running City2Surf with me. Doesn’t he know he is meant to be resting? Answer: yes because I told him. *Shakes head disapprovingly*) and then we are heading to the big smoke for a relaxed night and dinner with fellow City2Surf runners. I’m all packed and ready to go.

Ready for some City2Surf action!

Ready for some City2Surf action!

The sweat bands are a new addition and salmon coloured so as not to match anything else. This is a little gross but when I run my nose runs with me and I’m sick of wiping it on my shirt (Hubby says we should call then snot bands. Yep. Classy.)

Check list includes:

  • Running pants (new Lorna Jane, my fav)
  • Racer back yellow shirt
  • Sports bra and Lorna Jane crop (for extra warmth and style more than anything…)
  • Garmin and heart rate monitor. I want this baby on the record
  • Race bib (bit pointless without this one)
  • Shoes (not Vibram Seeya, no way could I run the distance in them yet)
  • Headband to keep that pesky fringe off my face
  • A banana. Pre-race breakfast. I’m also going to get an iced coffee and neck them both 2 hours before race start.

I haven’t mentioned it but I’m running for a charity, the Black Dog Institute who raise money and awareness of mental health disorders including depression. If you would like to donate here is the link. Otherwise move on with your life.

I’ve already had two big glasses full of liquid and this trend will continue. I want to be SUPER hydrated. Thought about setting my alarm to drink through the night but that seems a little mad.

So. Nothing left to do but like…run it I guess. This time tomorrow it will be over.

Wish me, and the 85,000 other runners who probably are treating this way less seriously than me, luck!

‘You are better than your last run’ and other lies I tell myself

City2Surf is around the corner. It is literally less than a week away and, well, I may be freaking out somewhat (I know, first world problems right). This time next week I will be feeling either the accomplishment of all my weeks of preparation….or looking for a different hobby.

I am actually quite worried that I have peaked too early. I followed my City2Surf training plan like a boss for the first 6 weeks and was feeling great, good pacing and lots of improvements. Then we went on our first snow trip. Slightly derailed but I got back on the training wagon after I had recovered. The we went to the snow again for a weekend of boarding (BTW I am going to completely gloss over my month-long blogging absence. Also, barefoot running post coming up shortly, not quite ready yet for that one) and when I tried the same run with one week difference…I tanked. Completely. I couldn’t even keep finish a flat 7 km course. On Sunday I did a 12km course including Bar Beach Hill (horrible hill in Newcastle similar to ‘heartbreak hill’)…couldn’t run up the whole thing. Normally I struggle yes, but I just keep on bloody running. This time, my calves were on fire and I had to stop and walk several times. It didn’t feel great.

OK, so it may seem as though I am heading towards a pity party and setting myself up with an excuse to not make my goal. But here’s the thing: running is hard. Also, more importantly (I find), it is unpredictable. There are so many factors that can influence your run (weather conditions, hydration, energy levels, time of day etc) but THE most important is your MENTAL STRENGTH, how FOCUSED you are. One weekend off running does not change your overall fitness, missing a few gym sessions doesn’t reduce your muscles to quivering weakness. Self sabotage on the other, can wreak havoc. If you think you are going to fail, its hard to convince yourself to keep on running. And it is a downward spiral, once I stop once, I am way WAY more likely to stop again (must be the instant gratification).

I know I am better than my last run, I know I can do City2Surf in sub 90 minutes and I KNOW that, no matter what, the feeling I will have from running City2Surf at all, let alone meeting my goal, will be amazing and worth whatever pain it costs.

Pre-Race Preparation

So. My plan for this week includes:

  1. Yoga. Lots of it.
  2. Eating healthy, nourishing foods including lots of carbs (half-hearted carb-loading…)
  3. Drinking A LOT of water
  4. Two gentle runs. Not timed.
  5. No exercise AT ALL from Friday on.
  6. Calm the hell down, it’s meant to be a freaking fun run!!

Today I have taken Melvin for a walk, a run, done a yoga session and a 60 minute pump class. I’m feeling good. Strong and focused. I’ll be tapering off my training now so I am as fit as I can be.

I just have to believe I have done enough. No, I KNOW I’ve done enough. Exhale.

Comparison the Dea(r)th of Confidence

On Saturday I beat my all time best 5 km run time by 20 seconds and achieved a goal I had been working towards for over a year: run 5 km in under 30 minutes (my parkrun time this week was 29 minutes and 44 seconds). I have done it once previously on a different course (29 minutes 58 seconds) but almost died in the process and had a small vommi at the finish line. That was in April and I had been unable to match this time, until now.

The funny thing is, while I was running it on Saturday, I was thinking to myself how crap I was at running and I didn’t know why I kept trying. People kept overtaking me and my friend, who I introduced to parkrun and who was doing his first ever 5 km, had outstripped me in the first km.

I hadn’t been watching my pace very closely to begin, only for the last 2 or so km and thought I was way over the 30 minute mark. It wasn’t until I rounded the last turn, saw the finish line and saw I was at 28 minutes that I realised I was going to make it in under 30 minutes.

How did it manage to surprise me so greatly? The run hurt, yes, I was definitely pushing it. My new way of thinking is ‘yes, this hurts. But you know what, if you slow down it’s not going to hurt less, you will just finish with a worse time. So just keep going and you won’t feel any worse.’  It works quite well, I think the interval running I am doing is helping there.

So why did I believe I was doing so badly? My mistake, I believe, was to compare myself with other people.

I compared myself to my friend, who finished in 25 minutes, and who is athletic. He rides, does all sorts of extreme sports and is generally an athletic person (he once paddle boarded for over 12 hours straight just because he wanted to know if he could).

I compared myself to my husband. The day before I did parkrun my husband did a 14 km run ‘just to make sure’ he would be able to run City2Surf. My goal for City2Surf is to scrape through under 90 minutes after a relatively intense 10 week training program. He did the same distance, with absolutely zero preparation, in 80 minutes. I was both impressed and depressed by this.

I’m not sure what the moral of this story is. Would I have done a faster time if I had felt more confident and secure in my running capabilities? Or was comparing myself to faster runners motivating me to try a little harder and make me push a little bit faster?

I think I need to just be comfortable with the fact that, no, I am not an ‘athletic’ person. Every single physical activity I have ever done or tried I have had to work HARD for and have been CRAP at to begin. Sweat, pain and often humiliation (snowboarding in particular I could tell you some stories) occur whenever I try something physically demanding.

That doesn’t mean I shouldn’t try, or push myself or be proud of my achievements.

I am still a runner and no one, no matter how fast they run, can take that away from me.